The goal of the MTA Office of Safety, Quality Assurace and Risk Management is to achieve the highest practical level of safety for all MTA modes of transit, in an effort to protect passengers, employees, revenues, and property. MTA has implemented a proactive system safety program plan. These efforts are supported by the Federal Transit Administration for developing guidelines and best practices to provide a safe transit system.

MTA Environment Policy Statement

Protecting the environment matters every day at MTA. 

Protection of the environment is one of the MTA’s most important responsibilities as we provide vital transportation services to the people of Maryland. It is our policy to conduct our mission in a manner that protects the environment, prevents pollution, and supports conservation of our natural and cultural resources. Through this policy, the MTA commits to:

  • Comprehensive environmental protection and continual environmental process improvement
  • Early introduction of environmental protection and pollution prevention in the planning states of new programs, transit facilities and in all work conducted on MTA properties
  • Compliance with applicable federal, State and local environmental regulations and policies, supported by regularly scheduled internal assessments
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of MTA’s environmental management program through application and review of the Environmental Management System to ensure that established objectives and targets are met
  • Promotion of a spirit of collaboration, cooperation and responsiveness both internally and with federal, state and local regulators
  • Establishment, implementation, and maintenance of MTA’s environmental policy to support effective communications to all employees and interested parties
  • Proactive, sound environmental stewardship

 

Please visit the following websites for more information about the full scope of MTA’s environmental responsibilities.

MTA Policies for any MTA Vehicle

Environment Initiatives

Environmental Programs

MDE’s mission is to protect and restore the quality of Maryland’s air, water, and land resources, while fostering smart growth, economic development, safe communities, and quality environmental education, for the benefit of the environment, public health, and future generations. The Department accomplishes its mission by assessing, preventing, and controlling sources of pollution to foster an excellent quality of life for all Marylanders.

MDE has three media-specific administrations and two other major administrations that provide administrative and technical support to the air, water and waste management administrations. The Department's primary services include permitting/licensing and inspections for 89 functions and different regulatory facilities, financial assistance, environmental clean-up oversight, technical assistance for compliance and pollution prevention, public education and outreach, and environmental emergency response.

Related Resource And Information Links

Pedestrian Safety

Maryland Transit Administration makes getting around our city quick and easy. But sometimes a bit of walking is required to reach your destination. Whether you're walking in Downtown, or other parts of town, MTA wants to help keep you safe with the following safety tips.

  • Always walk on the sidewalk or designated walkway.
  • Be cautious walking along driveways. Often motorists do not expect or anticipate pedestrians in these areas.
  • Cross the street only at a corner or designated crosswalk.
  • If there are no crosswalks, signs or signals, pedestrians should yield to all vehicles.
  • Always look both ways and over your shoulder (for turning cars) before crossing the street.
  • Never enter the roadway from between parked cars or behind shrubs or bushes.
  • The traffic signal alerts you when it is safe to cross the street. Never cross against it.
  • At intersections with traffic lights and pedestrian signals, wait until you see the WALK signal and look both ways for traffic before crossing.
  • A flashing DON'T WALK signal warns you it is no longer safe to begin crossing the street.
  • If the DON'T WALK signal begins flashing as you are crossing the street, the timing mechanism provides you with enough time to reach the other side safely.
  • Never cross the street on a steady DON'T WALK signal.

System Safety

Your Guide to MTA Safety

Keeping Passengers & Employees Safe is the Highest Priority at MTA

There is no more important mission at MTA than looking out for our passengers’ and employees’ well being. As a public organization, we are also responsible to the citizens of Maryland for protecting the property and revenues of the MTA. Through our proactive safety program, managed by the Office of Safety, Quality Assurance and Risk Management, we strive to excel at both missions, every minute of every day of the year.

We can’t do it alone, though. No matter how you interact with the MTA, we invite you to consider how you play the most important part in keeping yourself safe. Please take a look at the safety tips below.

Local Bus Safety Tips

We will get you there. Safely. But you play the most important part in taking care of yourself and your loved ones. Here are some tips to stay safe while on and off the bus.

  • Wait at the bus stop. Drivers are instructed to pick up passengers only at designated MTA stops.
  • Stand at a safe distance from the curb. If the bus approaching is the one you want, let the operator know by waving your hand. Be sure to stay clear of the bus until it has stopped completely.
  • Do not run for the bus. Allow enough time to get to the bus stop before the scheduled time. Once the bus has pulled away from the stop, MTA operators are not allowed to stop for passengers. If you miss the bus, please wait for the next one.
  • Watch your step getting on or off the bus. Place your feet solidly on each step. Never skip or jump over the steps. When exiting by the rear door, hold on to the handle until you have stepped completely off the bus.
  • Do not play on the bus. Disorderly conduct can lead to injuries or you being asked to leave the bus.
  • Hold on when standing. Use the handrails and bars to steady yourself while standing or walking on a moving bus. Never stand or sit in any of the bus stairwells or lean against the doors.
  • Do not stand in front of the yellow line. The area between the driver and the front door must always be kept clear.
  • Keep every part of your body inside the bus. Extending your head, hands or arms outside of the bus windows is extremely dangerous.
    Keep aisles clear. Most MTA buses have a small amount of space beneath each seat to store book bags and other small articles. If you can’t place it under the seat, hold it on your lap. Keep your legs out of the aisle, too. Aisles need to be kept clear for other passengers to walk.
  • Follow the operator’s instructions. If you miss your stop or there is an emergency, tell the operator and follow their instructions. MTA operators can get help quickly from the police, fire department or rescue personnel, if needed.
  • Wait before crossing the street. Wait until the bus has left the bus stop before you cross the street. Look both ways before crossing the street and always cross in the crosswalk.
  • Remember – safety is your responsibility too. We will do everything we can to keep you safe. Please be sure to do the same for yourself.
Light Rail Safety Tips

“Light” Rail is its name, but safety on Light Rail should never be taken lightly. No matter where you encounter Light Rail tracks or trains, stop, look and listen, please. Carefully!

  • Do not trespass on Light Rail tracks.
  • Cross only at designated crossings. Look both ways for oncoming trains before walking.
  • Never walk or drive across the tracks when you see a moving train or a red traffic signal.
  • In the stations, stand behind the yellow strip while waiting for the train, and when the train is approaching the station.
  • Walk – do not run – on the platform. If you miss a train, wait for the next one.
  • When standing, always hold onto the railing while the train is operating. Please don’t lean on the train doors, or leave personal belongings on the seat or in the aisles.
  • Do not sit, stand or walk on couplers of the train.
  • Stay alert. Be aware of your surroundings and the people around you. In an emergency, remain calm and follow instructions from the operator or MTA Police. Listen to announcements and know the locations of emergency releases, exits and fire extinguishers.
  • Report any suspicious behavior, unsafe conditions or unattended packages to the operator or MTA Police. Use the intercom to speak to the operator.
  • If you lose an item in the track way, do not attempt to retrieve it. “Train time is any time,” so notify an MTA employee or MTA Police.
  • Please do not smoke, eat or drink on trains or while at a Light Rail stop. It’s against the law and helps to keep Light Rail stops clean.
  • Always stop, look and listen. Obey all warning devices, including flashing lights, signals and crossing gates.
Metro Subway Safety Tips

Metro Subway will get you where you’re going – fast. Even if you’re concerned about missing the train, there’s always another not far behind. So take your time at all times around Metro Subway trains, tracks and platforms.

  • Always stand behind the yellow safety line while waiting for the train, especially when the train is approaching the station. Allow the train to come to a complete stop and the doors to open before approaching.
  • Once aboard the train, move to the center of the car. Remember to allow people to get off before you board.
  • Walk – do not run – on the platform. If you miss a train, wait for the next one. Never hold or block train doors from closing. Tampering with train doors can result in a disruption in service.
  • When standing, always hold onto the railing while the train is operating. Do not lean on train doors, and please do not leave your personal belongings in the aisles or on the seats.
  • Never cross between train cars.
  • Stay alert. Be aware of your surroundings and the people around you. In an emergency, remain calm and follow instructions from the operator or station manager. Listen to announcements and know locations of emergency releases, exits and fire extinguishers.
  • Report any suspicious behavior, unsafe conditions or unattended packages to the operator or station manager. Use the red phone located on each station level or use one of the intercoms to speak to an operator while on the train.
  • If you lose an item in the track way, do not attempt to retrieve it. “Train time is any time.” Notify the Station Manager or MTA employee.
  • Please do not smoke, eat or drink on trains or while in a Metro Subway station. It’s against the law and it helps to keep the Metro Subway stations clean.
  • When riding station elevators, watch clothing, bags and personal items since they can get caught in closing doors. Never use strollers to open closing doors.
  • Escalator steps are always moving, so keep clothing and shoes away from the sides and make sure laces on footwear are tied and not loose. Please do not use strollers or wheelchairs on escalators. Use the “Stop” button in case of an emergency.
  • Always stop, look and listen. Remember, “train time is any time.”
MARC Train Safety Tips

In recent years, commuter train safety and security awareness has taken on greater importance due to an increase in disruptive incidents worldwide. Local transportation agencies and law enforcement partners rely on people just like you to alert them to unsafe or uncertain conditions, no matter where they occur. Thank you for staying alert, both for your own safety and for the safety of your fellow passengers.

  • Walk, do not run. Many passenger injuries occur while trying to rush to catch a train. It’s especially important to take it slow in rain or snow.
  • In the stations, stand behind the yellow strip while waiting for the train. This is especially important when the train is approaching the station.
  • Never stand on or near the tracks. Trains are several feet wider than the tracks and can still hit you even if you are not on the tracks.
  • Keep away from all overhead or third rail wires that power trains. These high voltage carriers will cause serious injury or death.
  • Educate your children about the rules and dangers associated with commuter train travel.
  • Always hold your child’s hand while waiting for the train.
  • Report all unusual packages, activities and/or suspicious persons on a train, the tracks or at a station. Please do not leave bags unattended. If a neighbor appears to be leaving something behind, let them know.
  • Never race a train to a crossing. You will lose.
  • Trespassing on or around tracks is against the law. You may be subject to criminal prosecution for being and remaining on or near the track without authorization.
  • Only cross tracks at designated pedestrian crossings. Never cross directly in front of or behind a moving train, or under or through a stopped freight or passenger train.
  • On high level platforms, take care when crossing the gap between the car body and the platform.
  • On low level platforms, use the handrails for support when using the steps.
  • Never board or jump from a moving train.
  • Take care when walking to your seat. Bags, purses and laptop cases can injure others sitting in seats while you are passing.
  • Do not ride in the vestibules. Conductors are instructed not to move the train is passengers are standing in the areas between the cars.
  • On bi-level cars, do not stand or sit on the stairs separating levels of the cars. This is important even when queuing up prior to your arrival at a station.
  • Remain calm in the event of an emergency. The crew has been trained to handle emergencies. Please follow their instructions carefully.
  • In Washington Union Station, remain inside the station until your train has been posted.
Elevator and Escalator Safety

Please read the safety tips on our Elevator and Escalator Safety page. If you are traveling with children, be sure to go to the children's safety link- you and your child with be safer for it.

  • Clothing: Children should wear bright colored clothing, especially if waiting for the bus before sunrise or getting home after dark. Place removable reflective tape on their outer garments including on their hats and coats.
  • Boarding: Teach your children to only move forward to board a bus when it has come to a complete stop and the driver opens the door. Children should line up as they await entrance.
  • Seating: Neither MTA Buses nor school buses come equipped with seatbelts. Teach your children to be seated at all times and face forward. Teach them about optional exit strategies including using the emergency door or windows.
  • Exiting: When exiting the bus, children should move far away from the vehicle to allow the driver to see that they have cleared the bus and are safely away from traffic. Children should stand clear of all bus wheels.
  • Awareness: Teach your children to be aware of other traffic in the area. Do not assume that drivers will stop for them or even see them. Have them constantly look both ways as they cross the street until they are safely on the other side. Every year children die or are injured in school bus related accidents. Many die as a result of a collision involving their bus with another vehicle while others are killed or hurt as they fail to clear the area around the bus or are struck by oncoming traffic.
We want you to be comfortable

Passenger comfort is important to the MTA. We ask that everyone who rides an MTA vehicle practice courtesy and civility for the well-being of all.

  • Shoes and shirts are required of all passengers.
  • Eating and drinking is prohibited on MTA vehicles and platforms.
  • Please use a head-set when using a sound-producing device, including cell phones.
  • Behavior that is considered to be dangerous, disruptive, obscene, threatening, violent, inciting or insulting to other passengers (including inappropriate language and gestures) is not allowed.
  • Never delay, stop or prevent the operation of a transit vehicle.
Protecting the environment matters every day at MTA

Protection of the environment is one of the MTA’s most important responsibilities as we provide vital transportation services to the people of Maryland. It is our policy to conduct our mission in a manner that protects the environment, prevents pollution, and supports conservation of our natural and cultural resources. Through this policy, the MTA commits to:

  • Comprehensive environmental protection and continual environmental process improvement
  • Early introduction of environmental protection and pollution prevention in the planning states of new programs, transit facilities and in all work conducted on MTA properties
  • Compliance with applicable federal, State and local environmental regulations and policies, supported by regularly scheduled internal assessments
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of MTA’s environmental management program through application and review of the Environmental Management System (EMS) to ensure that established objectives and targets are met
  • Promotion of a spirit of collaboration, cooperation and responsiveness both internally and with federal, State and local regulators
  • Establishment, implementation, and maintenance of MTA’s environmental policy to support effective communications to all employees and interested parties
  • Proactive, sound environmental stewardship

Please visit the following websites for more information about the full scope of MTA’s environmental responsibilities.

Maryland Department of the Environment
http://www.mde.state.md.us/

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.epa.gov/

Back to School Safety

Help us to keep your children safe by raising their awareness of potential hazards while getting to and from school.

  • Bus Stop: Your child's bus stop should be in an area that is well lit, easily accessible, and away from traffic. If it is not, contact school administrators to have the stop moved. In some situations, you may need to contact the City or State. If you live in an area where there is heavy snowfall, make sure that the stop is sufficiently free of snow, ice and related debris.
  • Clothing: Children should wear bright colored clothing, especially if waiting for the bus before sunrise or getting home after dark. Place removable reflective tape on their outer garments including on their hats and coats.
  • Boarding: Teach your children to only move forward to board a bus when it has come to a complete stop and the driver opens the door. Children should line up as they await entrance.
  • Seating: Neither MTA Buses nor school buses come equipped with seatbelts. Teach your children to be seated at all times and face forward. Teach them about optional exit strategies including using the emergency door or windows.
  • Exiting: When exiting the bus, children should move far away from the vehicle to allow the driver to see that they have cleared the bus and are safely away from traffic. Children should stand clear of all bus wheels.
  • Awareness: Teach your children to be aware of other traffic in the area. Do not assume that drivers will stop for them or even see them. Have them constantly look both ways as they cross the street until they are safely on the other side. Every year children die or are injured in school bus related accidents. Many die as a result of a collision involving their bus with another vehicle while others are killed or hurt as they fail to clear the area around the bus or are struck by oncoming traffic.

Seat Belts Save Lives

Seat Belts Save Lives
  • < li>Seat belts aren't just for those in the front seat. If a passenger riding in the rear seat is not belted, his or her body becomes a lethal weapon in a crash, moving forward with enough force to cause serious injury to someone riding in the front.
  • Wearing a seat belt is the single most effective action that any driver or passenger can take to safeguard their safety while on the road. They are the best defense against the risky driving behaviors found on our roadways.
Too Many Ignore the Facts
  • When seat belts are used properly, the risk of fatal injury to front seat passengers is reduced by 45%; the risk of moderate-to-critical injury is reduced by 65%.
  • 55% of those killed in a crash were NOT wearing their seat belt at the time of the crash.
  • Motorists on rural roadways face a much greater risk of being injured or killed than thosein urban or suburban areas.
Children Must Be Properly Restrained, Too

For maximum child passenger safety, parents, grandparents and caregivers should always remember and follow The 4 Steps for Kids.

  • Use rear-facing infant seats in the back seat from birth to at least 1 year of age an until they weigh at least 20 pounds;
  • Use forward-facing toddler seats in the back seat from age 1 and at least 20 pounds to about age 4 and 40 pounds;
  • Use booster seats in the back seat from about age 4 to at least age 8, unless the  child is 4'9" tall.
  • Use seat belts when they fit appropriately, usually at age 8 and older or taller than 4'9". ALL children up to age 13 should ride in the rear seat.

For more information on Traffic Safety, please visit trafficsafety.org

Buckle-Up Your Family.  Every Trip.  Every Time.

Watch Your Step

Customer Guide to Crosswalk Safety

Caution: is the key to your safety when you are at MTA Bus Stops.

Fact: Every 111 minutes a pedestrian is killed and every seven minutes, one is injured in a traffic accident according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

For your safety, please follow these safety tips:

Never run to get a bus. You could fall.

  • Do not walk between parked or standing buses.
  • Always use marked crosswalks.
  • Never assume the Bus Operator will stop for you. Yes, it the driver’s responsibility to stop, but he or she may not see you until it’s too late.
  • Be alert for cars backing out of parking spaces. (Park and Ride Lots)
  • When wearing earphones or talking on cellular phones, tune into your surroundings.
  • Be cautious in inclement weather.  Sidewalks and streets could be slippery from rain or snow.
At MTA, we are serious about your safety

You are important to us. MTA Safety Officers and other staff are in the system every day to help ensure your safety.

Operation Lifesaver - Rail Safety

Visit the Operation Lifesaver website at: http://oli.org/video/view/distracted-pedestrian-psa